Cresswell to Warkworth – 15 February 2020

We are going along the east coast this time out much like our first walk of the year at Bamburgh but this time a bit further south. We only have three coastal walks on our programme this year and the last one is in August when we walk between Coldingham and Dunbar. Part of the walk this time is along Druridge Bay which is 7 miles (11 km) long and stretches from Cresswell in the south to Amble in the north. The longest route is going to be walking along the length of it and the two other routes are going to be walking along Duridge Bay a bit further north.

We may not have been able to this during the Second World War because it was out of bounds to the public as it was thought of as a possible landing place for a German invasion. There were pillboxes and anti-tank blocks as well as minefields and an anti-tank ditch. Fortunately, the minefields are gone but there is still evidence of the pillboxes and anti-tank blocks which are slowly sinking into the sand or sometimes being uncovered by wind and tide.

All the walks follow each other along the coast with the 12.5-mile route starting at the village of Ellington and heading north to Cresswell Nature Reserve on the coast. From there the route follows the coast past Druridge Bay Country Park and then into Amble. From there it heads along the south side of the River Coquet and on into Warkworth. The 10.5-mile route starts at the village of Widdrington and heads east towards the coast passing the remains of a Chapel at Low Chibburn. The Chapel has been there since the 12th century when it was in the care of the Knight’s Hospitallers, it was abolished in 1540 but a Dowager House was built by the Widdrington family on the south side of the site and then the whole lot was burnt to the ground in 1691 by French invaders. Oddly enough, part of it was turned into a pillbox during the Second World War. Just past the Chapel, the 10.5-mile route comes to the coast and then follows the longer route all the way to Warkworth.

The shorter route of 8.5-miles starts at the village of Red Row and goes east on a track to the coast just to the south of Durridge Bay. From there this route also follows the other two routes to Warkworth.

If you would like to walk along the east coast on the best bit of coastline in the whole of Northumberland you can get in touch with us via our Contact Page. You also find the walk descriptions here and the GPX routes here.

So far this winter has been quite mild if a little wet now and again, but just in case anyone forgets what snow looks like the image for this post was taken in February 2013 on a walk on the North York Moors just after one of the groups had come down from Roseberry Topping and was heading for Captain Cook’s Monument.


Warkworth Weather

Walk No. 4 Cresswell to Warkworth 15 February 2020
Area: Northumberland Map: Exp 332, 335

8.5 Miles Moderate
Start: Red Row Grid Ref NZ255991
Path South-East through East Chevington Nature Reserve – Hadstone Links – Hauxley Links – Amble Links – Amble South Jetty – The Braid – Warkworth

10.5 Miles Moderate
Start: A1068 Road Grid Ref NZ253955
Widdrington – Castle Mound – Footpath East to Coast – Chibburn Links – Hadstone Links – Hauxley Links – Amble Links – Amble South Jetty – The Braid – Warkworth

12.5 Miles Moderate
Start: Ellington Grid Ref NZ274919
Footpath to Blakemoor Farm – Northumberland Coastal Path – Druridge Links – Chibburn Links – Hadstone Links – Hauxley Links – Amble Links – Amble South Jetty – The Braid – Warkworth

Pub: The Masons Arms Telephone No. 01665 711398